ARC-1

Tech Specs

Summary

  • 2.25” Diameter housing, approx. 21.5” long.

  • Buoyancy: slightly negative.

  • Capable of supporting a payload of 40 pounds (2X safety factor).

  • Depth rating: 1000 feet.

  • Powered by standard alkaline batteries.

  • Battery life: 6 months (2X safety factor).

  • Housed in serviceable Delrin and Noryl plastic housing with stainless steel release hardware.

  • Transponder functions support ranging to the units.

  • Station firmware can be upgraded through download, to support new functions.

  • Standard Desert Star surface stations can be used as interrogators.

Load Ratings

Design strength of components (other than release wire): 200 lb

Factory acceptance load test (with 26AWG wire): 80 lb

Recommended pre-deployment load test: 50 lb

Rated maximum load: 40 lb

Recommended nominal load: 15 lb

Rated minimum load: 10 lb


Release Wire

The ARC-1 is specified for use with the following release wire only.


Material: Nickel Chromium Alloy (60% nickel, 16% chromium, 24% iron)

Gauge: 26 AWG

Supplier: McMaster-Carr Part #8880K24 (1/4 lb spool), Desert Star Part #WIR00332


O-Ring Specifications

End caps: Parker 2-130, Compound E515 (qty 2). Desert Star Part #ORI00058

Support Posts: Parker 2-010, Compound E515 (qty 2). Desert Star Part #ORI00053


Battery Specification

Release and sonar transmitter battery: Four Duracell Model MN-1500 ‘AA’ alkaline cells

Nominal battery life: 520 days

Microprocessor battery: Four rechargeable eneloop batteries

Nominal battery life: 630 days


Note 1:

Under laboratory conditions, assuming power consumption at maximum limit for factory acceptance testing (0.8 mA for microprocessor in sleep mode, less than 0.05 mA for sonar/release section in sleep mode).


Note 2:

We recommend putting a safety margin in for the battery life. A very conservative approach would be half of the expected life time of the battery. You should also take the environment into consideration; you have a better chance of draining the battery in a very noisy harbor then you would in an open ocean.